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Happy end of September!! If you aren't already pulling your hair out enjoying the fabulous of beginning of the year , I'm sure you will be, sometime soon. I have been back in school for about 6 weeks now, and am tired as all get out!!
This is part 2 of a blog series to bring YOU some different games, resources and ideas to do with your primary (grades K-2) students. You can find Part 1 by clicking on the image below or the link HERE!

https://mommawithateachingmission.blogspot.com/2016/08/math-ideas-for-primary-classroom-part-1.html#more


Just a little background information on me--I am a STEM (which is math & science) teacher. I teach 1st and 2nd grade students. Students are flexibly grouped by their ability, which the opportunity to move up or down as the school year progresses if that is what the student needs. I teach 2 different groups of students; 1 group higher functioning 1st & 2nd graders (13 students- nine 2nd graders and 4  first graders) most of these students are on a first grade math level, which a sprinkle of a few students working on some 2nd grade skills/standards. My 2nd group of students (10 students- 2 of which are 2nd graders, and 8 are first graders) are the lower of the two groups. These students are functioning on a kindergarten/pre-kindergarten math level. Both groups of students fall in the bottom 10% of students in grades 1 and 2. We call these classes "tier 3"--so I am a "primary tier 3 stem" teacher :)  



So since my last blogpost, I have introduced "Fact Friday".  On "Fact Friday", students come to my table and are given their fact test. They all start on level 1, which is +0, +1, +2 facts. They have to correctly solve 18 out of 20 problems in 60 seconds a.k.a. 1 minute. If this seems like a lot to you, you aren't the only one! Students, parents, and teachers alike find it difficult to ask 1st graders to solve 18 problems accurately in 1 minute. But with some positive reinforcement, and not much emphasis on the passing a test, I have already seen success with my students!




I started out by sending home level 1 math fact bags. Our students have a take home folder, and in my little note to parents, I ask them to keep these math facts in their folder, and to practice them as much as possible.





Each student has their own data binder on my shelf. These are 1 inch binders I got on sale at Staples. Boys have orange spine labels, and girls have purple. As you flip open the binder. I have a half sheet for their MAP data. MAP is a test we take 3 times a year to monitor the students reading and math progress. You can grab the MAP progress sheet:


 Behind my MAP progress sheets, I keep their weekly math tests. I also track their progress in an EXCEL spreadsheet. I have 3 separate tabs at the bottom of the excel spreadsheet; one for my morning group, one for the afternoon, and one with all the students listed with levels passed. 


Beyond the math facts tests and MAP progress sheet, I have a sheet for each standard in the math common core. If the student is a 2nd grader working on 1st grade standards, I have the 1st grade math standard, as well as the 2nd grade math standard. Each standard sheet has the standard broken down into sections of that standard, with 10 trials, for the me (or the teacher) to write down the students progress, and then collect the artifacts (or evidence) to support that student either understanding the standard, or not.

 

During instruction throughout the day, my students start with a warm-up (number talk, or word problem), then we go into rotations. Rotations allow me to work within small group to instruct my students on their level. One of the rotations I have introduced that the students work on is Write their Math Facts. I know this doesn't sound like some of my other engaging rotations like Grocery Store, or Exercising with Dice, but sometimes I believe students need to practice a skill in isolation.


Our fact level program looks like this:

Level 1: +0, +1, +2
Level 2: -0, -1, -2
Level 3: Addition Ten Facts (ex. 10+5)
Level 4: Subtraction Ten Facts (ex. 15-5)
Level 5: Addition Doubles (ex. 2+2)
Level 6: Subtraction Doubles (ex. 4-2)
Level 7: Addition making 10 Facts (ex. 3 +7)
Level 8: Subtraction making 10 facts (ex. 10-8)

By end of the 1st grade students are expected to have passed the first 8 levels. By the end of 2nd grade, students are expected to have passed the first 15 levels, which are all the addition and subtraction facts. Starting in 3rd grade, students are expected to start passing the multiplication facts. 

Now, let me regress at moment. That lower level of students that I teach (that are working on a pre-k/kindergarten math level), they struggle at these fact tests. For example, this is what one of the Level 1 tests look like: 

So some of the students (5 out of 10) in my afternoon class, answer the math fact by copying the equation--For example if the question was 0 + 2= they would write 0 + 2=. They don't get the concept of a number is an amount. So with them, I do test them every Friday to monitor their progress, but we have also been working on numbers and counting and making meaning of numbers. 



We have taken the time to look at numbers 0-9 and what they look like in numeral form, word form, tens frame, tally marks, on a number line, and in a picture. My students have also worked with number puzzles from 1-9 matching the numeral with the dots. We have also worked on rolling a die, and talking about +1 to that number. We haven't got yet to +2 to a number, but that is in the works for this week! 








If you are interested in the above supplemental printables, making meaning from dots to digits, click on the image below!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Dots-to-Digits-Making-Meaning-of-Numbers-2801536

You can also find the Common Core math Standard Checklists by clicking the links below! And did I mention these are EDITABLE?!?!?

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Checklists-2nd-Grade-Math-Common-Core-EDITABLE-2742874https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Checklists-Kindergarten-Math-Common-Core-EDITABLE-2768157


 Please leave your comments for helping students improve their fact fluency!! Wishing you all a fantastic October!!

Happy back to school season friends!! If you aren't already back in school, I'm sure you are going back sometime soon. I have been back in school for about 2 weeks now, and am tired as all get out!!
This is part 1 of a blog series to bring YOU some different games, resources and ideas to do with your primary (grades K-2) students. 

Just a little background information on me--I am a STEM (which is math & science) teacher. I teach 1st and 2nd grade students. Students are flexibly grouped by their ability, which the opportunity to move up or down as the school year progresses if that is what the student needs. I teach 2 different groups of students; 1 group higher functioning 1st & 2nd graders (13 students- nine 2nd graders and 4  first graders) most of these students are on a first grade math level, which a sprinkle of a few students working on some 2nd grade standards. My 2nd group of students (10 students- 2 of which are 2nd graders, and 8 are first graders) are the lower of the two groups. These students are functioning on a kindergarten/pre-kindergarten math level. Both groups of students fall in the bottom 10% of students in grades 1 and 2. We call these classes "tier 3"--so I am a "primary tier 3 stem" teacher :) 

So in case you have a few students that need something 'different' or maybe a whole class set, here are a few ideas of what I have been working on with them!
Counting Stations


One of the 1st standards I have begun to cover is 1.NBT.1 (common core). This standard states the student will be able to read, write, count, and represent any number from 1-120, starting at any given number. 

So one of the first things we did to get acclimated to our classroom, and classroom materials, was to count different objects (with a partner). This was a random group of objects I put together, but the picture below can be used for counting stations with your students as the recording sheet.

I actually had a sub do this on a day I had to be absent (the 5th day of school). Then the following day, it led to a great conversation about putting objects into groups and counting that way (groups of 10s and counting by 10s). One could even change the quantities of the objects, laminate the recording sheet, and the the students work on the counting stations for an extended period of time (a week or so).
Exercising with Dice


So one of the independent rotations (stations) I added almost immediately was exercising with dice. I used Whimsy Clips MEGA cute exercise clipart, and created some task cards on fun astrobrights paper. I added these fun, bright, foamy dice and BAM the kids love it! I took a day (about 15 minutes) and as a class we went over each exercise. The students knew most of them from doing them in gym class. 
Grocery shopping






I racked my brain to come up with a meaningful way for my kiddos to count. Many of them don't understand the value of being able to count. So why not add money?!?! I'm starting off with pennies and dollars, since both their value is 1, and hope to add nickels, dimes, quarters, as well as other dollar bills when the students are ready. I have 'differentiated' versions of grocery shopping for my 2 different classes of kiddos. The yellow cards (shown on the left) are for my students functioning on a 1st grade level. These task cards contain various items from the grocery store. The red task cards (shown on the right) are for my students functioning on a kindergarten level. These task cards contain fruits and vegetables. Within the rotation time, one students acts as the clerk, and the other as the buyer. The buyer says, "I would like to buy some bread" the clerk would then say, "you owe 1 dollar and 4 pennies". So the buyer would count out that much money, and any good clerk double checks the buyers coins and bills! The students love this role playing grocery shopping!
Racing to fill the chart

 My kiddos desperately need to practice writing all their numbers from 1-120. Within my group of students functioning on a 1st grade level, I have them practice racing their partner to fill out the entire 120s chart. They each have a reference 120s chart, in case they need it. In my group of students functioning on a kindergarten level, I have them work with their partner to fill out either the 20s chart or 50s chart (depending on their ability). They also have a reference 120s chart to help them in case they become stuck. 

120s Number Puzzles


 I love these number puzzles! And I know I'm not the one who came up with this idea, but I'm not sure where I originally saw it! But, my students just struggled to put the numbers together, so I thought, why not add that reference 120s chart underneath to help them in case they get stuck! My students love these puzzles! 

Fill 'er up!


This is a very simple game that you can have your students play. My students work in pairs, so I have 2 cups for them to work on filling up. They take turns rolling the dice, and then adding that many manipulatives (buttons in this picture) into their cup. The first person to fill up their cup is the winner. Of course, I switch out the manipulatives every couple days to keep it fresh for them.

Memory: Crossing the decade


This week I have played this memory game in small group with a few of my students. On the left side (to the students left, teachers right side) are the numbers ending in 9 (19, 49, up to 119), and on the right right are multiples of 10 (from 10-120). So as the students pull a card from left side, they read the number (ex. "This is 49") then they also say what they need to match it, (ex. "I need 50). So they pull from the left first, and then the right. If they get a match, they get to pick again, if they don't get a match, it's the next persons turn.

Before/After Number Bingo


This super simple game is one that my students have begged for this week! They have their game boards and chips, and I turn over a number card and ask, "what number is this" one of them answers, "seven", and then I ask, "What comes next? Cover it up!" The first student to get four in a row horizontally, vertically, or diagonally wins (a sticker---woohoo ;) ) 

Roll and count on
During small group, with about 4 students, I will tell them I am going to roll 2 dice to make a 2 digit number.  I then tell them that they will tell me what comes next. So if I roll a 4 and a 9, I will say "ok 49, what comes next, and we will count on around the table (50, 51, 52, 53)". I will do this for multiple days, just for a couple minutes during our small group instruction. I am assessing to see if they can start from any number and count on. 


Hopefully you've gotten some ideas to help your students number sense!

If you liked the ideas you read about in this post, you can find all them (plus some extras!) by clicking the image below!
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Math-Games-and-Resources-for-the-Primary-Classroom-Unit-1-Number-Sense-2762879

 
If you are in need of some more formative assessments for your students for counting and the standard 1.NBT.1, feel free to check out these printables that are great for quick check ins, homework, or independent work by clicking the image below!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Common-Core-Math-1NBT1-No-Prep-Printables-1670360 

Make sure to follow me on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to be notified of what is happening in my classroom to get some fun math ideas for your kiddos!
Hey my fellow friends!!! Happy back to school season!! Hopefully you are adjusting to those early morning alarm clocks, as well as those late night planning sessions (hopefully not).

I have to be honest. This beginning of the year has me like...


Seriously. I feel like I can post this since I am preggo with baby #5---ahhhhh. Will you have a freak out moment with me??!! Seriously not planned. However, I know some of the greatest things in life aren't planned! But nonetheless ahhhhhhhh :D 


Just have to share our photo. I have to say the boys were very excited to see that baby #5 was a boy, and the girls quickly got over their sadness of no baby sister. 

So the beginning of the school year is in full swing, with 9 days of school under our belts, I have to say WOWOWOW. I am still only teaching STEM this year to the lower level 1st and 2nd graders. My morning blocks consists of 13 kiddos functioning on a 1st/2nd grade math level, and my afternoon block consists of 10 kiddos functioning on a kindergarten math level. It will be an interesting year, and I am super excited to learn along with them!

Many of my students aren't able to learn in traditional ways, so I've had to scour and create things for them that they are able to do, feel success with, as well as be somewhat challenged. So please stay tuned for a series of blog posts in 


I hope to have the first blog post in this series up this weekend (Labor Day--woohoo) on what I have done in my classroom, with some ideas what you can do with your kiddos!
Hello Friends!! Welcome :D Hopefully you are enjoying a little summer drink with a festive umbrella!! You are in for some fun! And I'm so glad you are here :) 


So this summer the only book on my reading list is Debbie Dillers' Math Stations : Work Stations you can count on


The school where I teach, every teacher is subject specific. Each teacher is either a STEM or an ELA teacher. This past school year I was a first grade ELA teacher, however, after graciously being given what I wanted by admin, I will be teaching math to grades 1 and 2. 

So the reason I have chosen to read Debbie Diller's book is because first of all I love all her books, second of all I need a little refresher in math and work stations.


For this week only (July 2-July 9), this item will be free!! After that, it was be moved back to it's original price of $3! So be sure to download it by clicking the image below!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Editable-Classroom-and-Bathroom-Rules-Posters-2606197



As a teacher mom, I thoroughly enjoy my summers. However, it never fails that I get suckered into teaching summer school. I mean the money is really good, and I enjoy helping out, but every year I tell myself I'm not gonna do it, but then when admin goes looking for someone to teach, I'm always the sucker they go to!

But, on my bucket list this summer I have some great things!

First thing on my summer bucket list for 2016, I am taking my family to Disney in one short week! Everyone is so excited! I am a mother to 4 kiddos, ages range from 2 to 11, and each one of them is super excited! I have to admit, my hubs and I are also anxious to go.

The second item on my summer bucket list for 2016 is to complete another project in my living room. Although it has been a SUPER s-l-o-w process, it is getting done. Over spring break I was able to paint the living room, and over late July/early August I hope to pull up the carpet and put hardwood flooring down! Then eventually buy all new furniture for this room, but that'll probably be an October/November purchase!

The third and final item on my bucket list for 2016 is to just enjoy it. Throughout the school year we are in go-mode. Between 2 boys in different leagues in football (fall), basketball (winter), and baseball (spring) and a daughter in baton (year-round) and a 2 year old, we are CONSTANTLY on the go. I always forget how much I love cooking, until summer time! Throughout the school year, we are rushed with quick meals, or pizza, subway, or chinese. The summer I have the time to really enjoy diving into my grandmothers' old cookbooks and trying new recipes.

Feel free to leave a comment below about what is on your summer bucket list.






Make sure to hop to the next stop to grab the limited time freebies!!

http://teachingadventuresinthemitten.blogspot.com/2016/06/schools-out-blog-blowout.html
 

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